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THOMPSON OR TAMIHANA  

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LorraineThompson OWC
(@lorrainethompson-owc)
Active Member

I'm a young maori who has been left in the dark. Now my surname Thompson comes from my koro but when he passed away I saw on his grave that he was a Tamihana. I do not know his parents or where they come from but he was buried in Te Hapua, but what I really want to know is where my whanau really comes from because last time I checked (years ago), my koro is the only one in his urupaa with his surname. Gets me all confused, somebody please help.

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Posted : 21 March, 2007 9:38 am
tm OWC
(@tm-owc)
Active Member

Tena Koe Lorraine,

Do you have any other info about your Koro.My Dad is a Tamihana originaly from Tai Tokerau.But lived in the Wanganui.

Kia Ora.

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Posted : 21 March, 2007 10:45 am
LorraineThompson OWC
(@lorrainethompson-owc)
Active Member

I can't say I know anything else, but you might have whanau that know him, he was an Apotoro for the church. In saying that would you know my marae and maunga and all that stuff.

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Posted : 21 March, 2007 7:58 pm
tm OWC
(@tm-owc)
Active Member

Tena Koe Lorraine

Just checking to see if you saw my reply before I shoot off too mahi.

Do you have your Koro's first name. My father was a very staunch Morehu. And alot of his nephews were Apotoro's

I'am currently reading a beautiful book written by my Dads first cousin whom I'am very grateful as I have learnt alot from it so far, and go back many generations through this one persons dedication and I also have to acknowledge his niece and all the others that contributing.

There are alot of family trees in this book and maybe your Koro's name is in there.
Thanks to this book I now know my fathers side.And honoured to be a Ngati Kahu.

I am about to take off to mahi now Lorriane so I wont be on the net till apopo probably pm.

Pomarie.

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Posted : 21 March, 2007 8:19 pm
LorraineThompson OWC
(@lorrainethompson-owc)
Active Member

Kia ora,
My koro's name is Hepeti Matiu Tamihana he has a sister named Lavinia (Nana Love) and that is the only close whanau of his I know although I know this is more. But it would be alot if you could help me. Oh by the way his wife's (Nan) name is Rerio I hope that helps.

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Posted : 21 March, 2007 8:29 pm
tm OWC
(@tm-owc)
Active Member

Morena Lorraine,

That was also my Koros name but this one married Poihaere.And he passed many moons ago.There was however another Hepeti my first cousin I dont know his wifes name but he was an Apotoro and if I can remember correctly there were four brother that were Apotoro. If this is the one you have alot of Whanau in Auckland.Even his younger brother who was not an Apotoro lives there with his whanau,when I mean young I mean 50-55yrs.And I only saw him this Jan.

Now the name of the book you should read is called Te Whanau Moana by McCully Matiu, Margaret Mutu.
Such a beautiful easy to understand book.But if you find it hard to get a hold of I will give you the info from the book.

Now I was told by one of the Tamihana's back in Jan. That that they were hoping to have a Tamihana reunion x-mas but I havent heard anything else yet.

Before I go our surname was actually Matiu.They dropped it and kept Tamihana.Apart from reading it in the book I heard it when we were little that I surname was Tamihana Matiu

Until I hear from you again.

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Posted : 22 March, 2007 8:53 am
LorraineThompson OWC
(@lorrainethompson-owc)
Active Member

Kia ora,

Yep that's my koro because I've seen a photo of him and his brothers and they are in their robes and stuff.

Now I know some of the whanau out in manurewa and I think the person you saw was Koro Tom and his wife is Nana Lucy and these are my Dad's(James) whanau, unfortunately my mother and he split when I was born and I don't know them as well as I would like to.

I don't think I can get a hold of this book you talk about at this point in time so the info would be awesome.

Oh and sorry what I was trying to find was my whakapapa (not the family tree), like the name of my maunga and marae and awa and everything else because my lovely partner is a strong Tuhoe who lucky for him was brought up with the reo and knows many things about his Iwi, and I feel really stupid when questions like where do you come from and what is your Iwi are asked and I don't have a clue.

Could you help me in this way?

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Posted : 22 March, 2007 9:51 am
tm OWC
(@tm-owc)
Active Member

Tena Koe Loraiane,

Ae Nana Lucy, I should say cousin Lucy - funny both of them.They are wee abit older than me but the same as my older siblings.They were and are very knowledgiable when it comes to the Ratana Church.Our tupuna's were knowledgiable full stop.I
know my Dad was and reading this book I get the impression they were and are a clever bunch.

Now I shall quote to you what McCully Matiu wrote in the book.Let me first tell you the connection between McCully You and I.McCully's father was Reihana who was Hepeti's younger brother.Hepeti had Wiremu (my Dad) and Matiu (your greatgrand) and Matiu had Hepeti (your Koro).

THE DESCENT LINE OF NGATI KAHU

Maungataniwha is the mountain,
Tokerau is the sea,
Kanutianui is the ancestress,
Te Parata is the man,
Mamaru is the waka,
Ngati Kahu is the tribe.

Kia Ora.

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Posted : 22 March, 2007 3:11 pm
tane_ariki OWC
(@tane_ariki-owc)
Trusted Member

I have that book Te Whanau Moana too.

If you can get into contact with Margaret Mutu, she'll be able to give you all the correct details.

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Posted : 22 March, 2007 3:18 pm
tm OWC
(@tm-owc)
Active Member

Tena Koe Tane Arike

I hope you enjoyed the book as much as I do.Personally I am ever so grateful too McCully and Margaret for their fantastic effort in creating this Beautiful Gem.Kai Pai.

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Posted : 22 March, 2007 3:35 pm
tane_ariki OWC
(@tane_ariki-owc)
Trusted Member

Tena koe tn,

I do like it. Have you read the preface? I really like the preface to the book. It is written quite well.

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Posted : 22 March, 2007 3:50 pm
tm OWC
(@tm-owc)
Active Member

Tena Koe,

Sorry I had to log out as the tamariki's needed my attention.

Yes I did read the preface and yes excellent.Iam one of those readers who cannot skip pages and read every word even though I cannot speak Maori it doesnt stop me from reading the Maori version,even though I struggle with some of the pronunciation.

Now tell me tane ariki are you Ngati Kahu?.Oops I have to log off again, might log back on 7:30ish.Sorry.

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Posted : 22 March, 2007 4:18 pm
tane_ariki OWC
(@tane_ariki-owc)
Trusted Member

Hey tm,

I hope the tamariki are well.

I'm not Ngati Kahu, but I have had (and still have) the honour of working with Prof. Mutu.

hence why I stumbled into this thread I thought to myself, I owe her so much when I saw Ngati Kahu pop up.

Ko Kahutianui te tupuna - that was her name, Kahutianui.

Ko Pūwheke te maunga,
Ko Karikari te moana,
Ko Māmaru te waka,
Ko Kahutianui te tupuna,
Ko Te Parata te tangata,
Ko Ngāti Kahu te iwi

That's not the whole pēpeha Lorraine, but its a part of it. I'm not too sure if connect to this hapū. So I'll leave it at that.

The book is called Te Whānau Moana.

On page 15 we read -

McCully's preference was for the entire book to be written in Māori. The central importance of the language was a basic tenet for him along with the fact that it, like the language of any society, is the only true way of reflecting the state, thinking and values of the society to which it belongs.

So Lorraine, the challenge for you now, to compliment your pēpeha, is to learn your reo.

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Posted : 24 March, 2007 11:52 am
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