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please help, question about iwi and marae  

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Panikoohine OWC
(@panikoohine-owc)
Active Member

CAN ANYONE HELP ME!

Hello, I was wondering if a Maori person does not know their Iwi or hapu or marae or anything of thbe sort through no fault of their own, if they talk to another maori person or try to join a maori culture club will they be shunned, will their be stigma? If one doesnt know their relatives will they be considered Maori? Can they still claim Maori as their heritage? Can they tell their children that they are Maori?

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Posted : 25 October, 2004 6:21 am
poutokomanawa
(@poutokomanawa)
Trusted Member

Kia ora Panikoohine

You have already "talked" here to Maori people with your post "Help" and you were not shunned and there is no stigma!

Kapa Haka (culture) groups don't shun people either, in fact as a kapa haka tutor of many years, I can say that we always enjoy having new members, regardless of who they are or their background! It is the passion of performing that is the uniting factor

If you consider you are Maori, you are Maori. That's it. Regardless if at this time you do not know your iwi, hapu or marae one day you will find out.

As artecwoman said to you in the reply to your post "help"

Be strong and keep searching and dont give up no matter what.Kia kaha (be strong)Kia toa (be brave)Kia manawa nui (have a big heart)

Nau te raurau,
Naku te raurau,
Ka ora ai nga tangata!
--------------------------------
Together we will get there!
--------------------------------

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Posted : 25 October, 2004 9:58 am
Sandy OWC
(@sandy-owc)
Active Member

Kia ora Panikoohine
I hope you find your whanau/Iwi/Hapu/marae. I know how hard it is when you are searching and looking for help. A part of the person feels like it is missing and needs to be found. Even if there are setbacks, just keep going. Your Tupuna walk with you and will help you. Maybe if you put some info and names that you know on this site someone might be able to help.
Kia kaha
Sandy

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Posted : 26 October, 2004 5:22 pm
artecwoman OWC
(@artecwoman-owc)
Active Member

Kia Ora Panikoohine

I know that it is so hard wondering and thinking who is my whanau and just constantly crying out for and it feels like you are just going around in circles but I tell you one thing if you think that you are maori that is who you are no matter what so kia kaha e hoa

na Inu

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Posted : 03 November, 2004 5:51 am
ngatiwai_boi OWC
(@ngatiwai_boi-owc)
New Member

kia ora Panikoohine,

If there is one thing that my kuia and kaumatua have taught me is that the colour of the skin does not make a maori , ones knowledge does not make a maori it is the pride and respect that one carrys for their culture and heritage that makes the maori.

To you I send out my strength of me and my tupuna in the hope that you may make that connection to your heritage .

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Posted : 03 November, 2004 5:31 pm
kakapo OWC
(@kakapo-owc)
New Member

quote:


If there is one thing that my kuia and kaumatua have taught me is that the colour of the skin does not make a maori , ones knowledge does not make a maori it is the pride and respect that one carrys for their culture and heritage that makes the maori.


Ae...

If you feel Maori..then that is what you are. Your whakapapa will come in time, as will the answers to many of your questions.

Ka apiti hono, hei tatai hono.

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Posted : 04 November, 2004 2:10 am
Anianiku OWC
(@anianiku-owc)
Active Member

Aloha Panikoohine,
I too agree with all who have posted replies. I know that your questions were related more to being accepted amongst Maori brothers and sisters despite not knowing/feeling Maori but I felt inclined to share this with you Panikoohine.

Before there were Hawaiians, Maori, Samoans etc. there was Papa and Wakea. You and I, all of us are children of them. You already know that you are Maori therefore you already have the geneology here on earth today that traces the lineage from Papa and Wakea to the wa'a (conoes) that arrived at the shores of Aotearoa with thanks to the kupuna that have memorized it.

It appears that you are searching the ancestors for reasons only known to you, so, thus I have shared about Papa and Wakea and the geneology that we have from that time. What I'm saying is that you can use the geneology as a leina (jumping off point/starting point) for your search to know of what it is to be Maori. I also beleive that it will help you to answer a question of "where do I fit in the tapestry of Maoritanga."

Mahalo kakou, mau keiki 'o Papa a me Wakea.

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Posted : 10 December, 2004 11:45 am
pearlau OWC
(@pearlau-owc)
Active Member

Tena koutou

It is awesome, to see the awhi, aroha, words of widsom, and knowledge, that the members of this forum extend to whanau seeking support.

There are many of our people, who are expriencing or have experienced the same thoughts, feelings, as you Panikoohine.

And for some, they move through life, without knowing who they are, or where they are from, and decide that it would be much easier to not know. This is their decision.

But Once you start on your journey to find your identity, there is so much that you learn, on your path, and it is a never-ending cycle.

From anything we learn in life, there will be good, there will be bad, but it is up to you, to take what is good, and learn from the bad.

Nothing in life we search for, is easy, and I have always thought it because, life is like a jigsaw, with many pieces, scattered, out to the winds.

There are big pieces to this jigsaw, which dont scatter out to the wind, and they are the pieces, that represent you, the person, your kaha, your aroha, your desire.

Retain these large pieces, and nuture them, and as one grows, the other pieces, join/connect back in to place, and slowly but surely, the formation of wholeness, contentment, starts to form.

Panikoohine, I wish you well in your search to find identity, Kia kaha.

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Posted : 20 February, 2005 9:31 am
hearty nati OWC
(@hearty-nati-owc)
Eminent Member

Kia Ora

E hine, i think it is one of the saddest things when one feels that way. If you have any Maori whakapapa, then you are Maori. There are over 100,000 Maori in NZ who do not know their iwi, hapu or marae but it is easier for them because they live in NZ, while you are in America.

Be strong e hine, never ever let anyone tell you that you aren't Maori and above all, never believe them. Have faith, have courage, have mana.

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Posted : 12 September, 2005 4:11 pm
Totaranui OWC
(@totaranui-owc)
New Member

Kia ora Panikoohine,
It has been nearly a year since your post. In your quest to be Maori look in, our tipuna are always with us, we are never alone. Rangatira- Ra Ngati Ra- Light Descendents of the Light. We are one. The journey of belonging is beautiful and here we are on this waka with you, that you created. The korero is inspiring. Kia kaha.

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Posted : 18 September, 2005 9:45 pm
ngati_kuri@hotmail.com OWC
(@ngati_kurihotmail-com-owc)
Eminent Member

Kura it has almost been two years and I hope your journey has been rich and eventful. Have you linked up with any immediate family yet? Within your maori.org.nz family if you want to post any information we may be able to set you on the right path before you fly home on the wings of an eagle and your barefeet touches the lifegiving earth of your ancestors.

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Posted : 24 July, 2006 4:44 pm
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