Welcome to the Whakapapa Club Forums where you will find a wealth of information.  You are free to browse the forums, but if you wish to comment or add requests, you must register, which is quick and easy and you can even use your Facebook Login.

Once you have signed up and posted either a reply or a new post it will not appear in the forums until it has been approved – this is to stop spam from appearing and keeping our Whakapapa Club Forums relavent for Whakapapa only.

If someone helps you don’t forget to acknowlege them.

TIKITIKI  

  RSS
interplanetjanet
(@interplanetjanet)
Eminent Member

Tikitiki. So many of our postings within this forum have Tikitiki connections. Its one of the places my own whanau also has early connections to.
Can anyone shed any light onto the history of the area and what type of work people would have been involved in also what "happens" there today?

Quote
Posted : 30 September, 2005 10:22 pm
hearty nati OWC
(@hearty-nati-owc)
Eminent Member

Ko Hikurangi te maunga whakaruruhau i te tini
Ko Waiapu te waiu e whanagai i te marea
Ko Rahui o Kehu te whare tawharau i te mano
Ko Ngati Uepohatu te iwi, no ratou nga ahi kaa roa e tiramarama ana mo ake, mo ake

This is a pepeha for the Tikitiki region which I hail from. My grandmother was born and bred here. Tikitiki is on the banks of the Waiapu river and is in the heart of Ngati Porou whenua.
There are many hapu, such as Te Whanau a Rahui, Ngati Uepohatu, Te Whanau a Puanga and Te Whanau a Takimoana.

You wont find much there today, the pub has burnt down and the one shop has closed, leaving only the RSA.

I would have to ask my mother about this papakainga to tell more, so i will post something after that.

E nga mana, e nga reo, e nga karangatanga maha o te urunga mai o te ra, tena ano tatou katoa

ReplyQuote
Posted : 12 October, 2005 11:54 pm
hearty nati OWC
(@hearty-nati-owc)
Eminent Member

Ko Hikurangi te maunga whakaruruhau i te tini
Ko Waiapu te waiu e whanagai i te marea
Ko Rahui o Kehu te whare tawharau i te mano
Ko Ngati Uepohatu te iwi, no ratou nga ahi kaa roa e tiramarama ana mo ake, mo ake

This is a pepeha for the Tikitiki region which I hail from. My grandmother was born and bred here. Tikitiki is on the banks of the Waiapu river and is in the heart of Ngati Porou whenua.
There are many hapu, such as Te Whanau a Rahui, Ngati Uepohatu, Te Whanau a Puanga and Te Whanau a Takimoana.

You wont find much there today, the pub has burnt down and the one shop has closed, leaving only the RSA.

I would have to ask my mother about this papakainga to tell more, so i will post something after that.

E nga mana, e nga reo, e nga karangatanga maha o te urunga mai o te ra, tena ano tatou katoa

ReplyQuote
Posted : 12 October, 2005 11:54 pm
interplanetjanet
(@interplanetjanet)
Eminent Member

Thankyou for sharing Tikitiki's pepeha with me. Sad that it sounds to have been largely abandoned as it seems as if it may have been a lively place in the 1800 -1880 era. I am not sure where exactly it is situated but I would like to see it once for myself just to get a feeling for the lay of the land etc. Its on my "TO Do " list!

ReplyQuote
Posted : 13 October, 2005 12:17 am
poutuedwards
(@poutuedwards)
Eminent Member

Kia Ora Joy,
Yes, Tikitiki is central along the Coast line between Tolaga and Te Araroa. It is also very true that there is little left of the buildings and such but this is the same all up the East Coast, and where-ever you go from Potaka in the North to Gisborne in the South you will see the same, 'sleepy little country-side living'.

It is not because the people have purposefully abandoned their posts. I believe it has more to do with the turn of the tides, the urban migration in the 50's-60's, of which my father was one...the Govt law changes (about the land)and more recently the search for employment. My descent is from Te Whanau a Tuwhakairiora and Te Whanau a Hinerupe from further up the East Cape. Today, many of the young commute out of the district for work and return home in the weekends. Sports days are exciting, marae challenges are a chance for the hapū to get together, actually theres one coming up...cant remember the exact date though.

My immediate whanau and I are thinking about entering a tug-o-war team.(lol standing 175cm, weighing 58kg, might be light on my feet but the heart is as big as a whale)

In the late 70's early 80's when uncle Jumbo drove the bus between Gisborne and Hicks Bay, and then over to Opotiki, I remember these little towns to be buzzing with activity, people everywhere, mind you... it was the school holidays lol.

peaceful regard
Jacqui

ReplyQuote
Posted : 13 October, 2005 11:41 pm
interplanetjanet
(@interplanetjanet)
Eminent Member

I have only vague recollections of the east Coast area. I recall it was very beautiful in a wild untamed way and that life was lived at a more relaxed pace than in the townships. I can also remember that it was not uncommon to see brumbies and horses loaded down with kids of all shapes and sizes having a ball and heading to their next destination.
Nice to know sme are getting "home" again even if it is just for the weekends and holidays.
I wonder how many of us would opt for the 50 and 60s urbinastion dream of a State House in the City and a job with Ministry of Works today. I have heard stories of people who really didnt want to go but had no choice in the matter. Must have been horrid for them.

The tug-of-war bought back lots of memories of bull rush etc. Heaps of fun...even if you dont win

ReplyQuote
Posted : 14 October, 2005 2:15 am
interplanetjanet
(@interplanetjanet)
Eminent Member

I am posting this update to thank those of you who have sent me photographs, information and helped me find where and why I have felt a strong connection to this area and its people.
Your aroha and sharing of memories has truly made me feel a part of the whanau. I am really grateful for the time and effort taken to enlighten me.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 27 October, 2005 2:28 am
andrei OWC
(@andrei-owc)
Active Member

Tena koe Markonjoy, did you hear that the government passed a Bill that makes rural and coastal districts no-go areas for the unemployed? That means Maori who are hoha with the Pakeha/euro-centric lifestyle of N.Z cities arent allowed to go home to their papa-kainga to live unless they can get a tax paying job when they get there. Many locals who mooved out, and their tamariki, cant come back because of this Bill. You watch, the Pakeha coastal property market will be making a killing in profit as Maori are chased off their tipuna whenua, unable to compete in the billion-dollar corporate land-grab. Colonisation and cultural racism are alive and well if the Government gets away with alienating Maori from their papakainga, and noone does anything about it. Maaui Walker

ReplyQuote
Posted : 09 November, 2006 9:51 am
interplanetjanet
(@interplanetjanet)
Eminent Member

Thankyou andrei, yes I have heard of that Bill and I am not a advocate for it.
NZ is not the first country to introduce such a narrow minded solution to unemployment.Usually the target group is those who are marginalised already through poverty and/or colour and who are blue collar workers.
NZ appears to understand and address the needs of its almost instinct insects, plants and animals way better than it does the needs of its almost extinct rural minority.This is just another example of cultural differences not truly being understood or respected.
I was told recently by a pakeha friend that there is nothing stopping Maori from living life traditionally within NZ, it is their co-dependance on Goverment handouts that keeps them as puppets on a short string dancing a gig instead of an independant Haka.
My reply to that was I dont believe in earlier times that Maori had to be concerned over things like rate payments for land. Education, health care etc are all things which are considered normal in todays world and which cost money. maori did not instigate these things they were forced upon them despite objections and now they are once again having their choices limited.
I often wonder if the "nobody does anything about it" aspect is because Maori seem geared towards looking after their own corners rather than putting that aside for the benefit of ALL.
Do you understand what I mean? Within the Forums you will find over and over the inter tribal type defence strategy for each individual is very strong. Once you suggest a unified effort could provide a stronger hand then all sorts of problems seem to occur and the subject goes flat.
I liken that to each person can look after their home best(Iwi), some can see further as to whats good for the neighbourhood (Hapu)but few seem to have the skills required to see the bigger picture of uniting Maori throughout NZ - putting aside our own tribal agendas for the benefit of us as "Maori people -today and tommorrow".
Lots of issues like this one could be effectively dealt with better with a more unified National front. I cant see we are going to ever be winners with the current system in place. The left hand is not only unaware of what the right hand does- both will even sabotage each other over old grievances "Utu".Together they could achieve alot but independantly the options are limited.
I had wondered what direction the Newly appointed Maori King would take in regards to the Custodianship and concerns of his People. It seems to me we are better off being focused on one unified approach to combat such Bills but I am unsure under whos umbrella the needs would be best met.

Edited by - markonijoy on Nov 09 2006 9:07:45 PM

ReplyQuote
Posted : 09 November, 2006 8:51 pm
Share: