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ChrisM
(@chrism)
Active Member

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Edited by - ChrisM on Jan 17 2007 10:04:26 AM

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Posted : 26 August, 2004 6:18 pm
poutokomanawa
(@poutokomanawa)
Trusted Member

Excellent question, I would love to know the answer to this as well

Nau te raurau,
Naku te raurau,
Ka ora ai nga tangata!
--------------------------------
Together we will get there!
--------------------------------

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Posted : 27 August, 2004 7:13 pm
hinetewai OWC
(@hinetewai-owc)
New Member

The ngati mamoe in the south island were said to pronounce some words and meanings differently,as do ngai tahu pronounces words differently to the north island tribes.ngati mamoe pronounced ngai as kai,which became a common usage to both tribes.Tho ngai is generally used as the tribe as a whole(eg:ngai tahu of the south island) and kai as the kai tahu as a seperate hapu/singular region description.Even more confusing is the use of gati and gai tahu, which has been read in many old texts by southland ngai tahu.As found in most countries around the world, you will find a distinct difference in tribal accent and wording, when these tribes are left in seperate locations.And whats worse, is when you are a southern maori, and north islanders try to correct your pronouciation.,when you may both be essentially correct depending on your tribal location.Either way,both ngai/ngati and kai, are generally accepted, until someone wants to be picky.hopes this answers your question.

....

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Posted : 02 September, 2004 11:20 am
ChrisM
(@chrism)
Active Member

Thankyou, for clearing that up.

Chris

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Posted : 02 September, 2004 11:20 am
Tuwharetoa_N8V OWC
(@tuwharetoa_n8v-owc)
New Member

Generally speaking the dialectual difference of Ngai Tahu is the K. The whānau down there do not pronounce the Ng and instead use K This is also shown with the name of Aorangi - Mt Cook pronounced as Aoraki. Dialectual differences throughout the motu are not only in pronounciation but also in words. For example a word can be used in one iwi for one thing and in another part of the country it can mean something else. Kia kaha in learning the Reo, safest way is to stick with your own rohe, Then as Hinetewai said they cant be picky. Mauri Ora Ki A Tatou

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Posted : 03 September, 2004 11:07 am
maitahi_steve OWC
(@maitahi_steve-owc)
Active Member

Kia ora koutou ka whanau o Kati Mamoe/Kai Tahu.

The K mita is primarily a southern one, it is from south of Otautahi down to the bottom on the East,
On the West Ngati Waewae in the Arahura use the Ng, yet the Kati Mahaki Ki Makaawhio in the south use the K.

In my own research I have found that the K mita was actually pronounced a gutteral K - more like a 'kg'.
My haroro (dad) pronounced Kowhai as go-ai
Kiekie as gege.
In the acient reo the mita also comprised of 'l' and 'b'.

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Posted : 26 June, 2005 3:14 pm
maitahi_steve OWC
(@maitahi_steve-owc)
Active Member

That was meant to be Ancient.

Pounamu was Poenamu.

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Posted : 26 June, 2005 3:18 pm
witewhiu OWC
(@witewhiu-owc)
Active Member

Teena ra taatu katoa.As a native speaker from Hokianga.l found that l had to use the taurawhiri i te Reo and their resources to assist myself with the reo thats been spoken today.The sound and the spoken reo has changed of the last 20yrs.Even my travelling through the South Island in early days.The locals spoke a very informal reo.A mixture of pigeon and northern.It is only lately that the Waipounamu are using a dialect.
In the 1970s there was survey covering the survial of the Maaori language.That only 3% of the Maaori people were native speakers.It makes me wonder where does that leave our reo today.
Blessings!
Na,Wi.

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Posted : 26 June, 2005 5:06 pm
maitahi_steve OWC
(@maitahi_steve-owc)
Active Member

Tru tena witewhiu.
Within Kati Mamoe Kai Tahu there is now only 1% native, and they are very old.
We down here have a 25yr stradegy to bring back the reo, so it has been these dwindling stocks of spaekers that have helped with our Tahu resurrgence.
There will always be debate about our reo, but we need to look to the whenua to see the ikoa that have been placed upon these lands as an indication of our past.

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Posted : 27 June, 2005 2:07 pm
witewhiu OWC
(@witewhiu-owc)
Active Member

teena koe horekau teenei e whakahe ana te reo o kai tahu.mena ka tahi paiheneti te eketanga o to kooutou reo ki te pai teena.taaku nei e korero ana mo toku haerenga ki ko ki te mahi.ko toku whaea kua waru tekau ma waru tau ia.He reo ano tona me ona rarangi kupu.
na,witewhiu.

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Posted : 22 September, 2005 8:06 pm
poutuedwards
(@poutuedwards)
Eminent Member

Kia ora koutou,
I was born in the south, and grew up in western southland where much of the maori population were a majority of the urban migration generation which may or may not have had an influence on the dialectual differences between the ng-k. Majority of the korero was more behind closed doors, and english tended to be the general consensus. But I, like many others were taught that Aoraki was indeed the Mauka, and taua and paua were the titles used for your grandparents.

I agree with maitahi steve with the reference to the old reo, and the usage of the L and B, once in Otakou I remember being intrigued with the word bibiwhalouloa, excuse the spelling. Again, in Waihopai I had the priviledge to be in the presence of a dear old friend who at my first tanes tangi, sat on the paepae as the manuhiri and spoke that old dialect.

Long story short, my parents were from the North and have their own whanau's dialects, I whanau au i te waipounamu, my main kaiako was from Ngati Hine and the te reo today is preety much the same allover in its general meaning, especially now that the language has been standardised.

My Nanny in porou-tanga korero e ki mai that she was ok with the fact I was learning the reo, but made a comment about kotahi mauri ora, in the old reo, first breath be your own...

peaceful regard
Jacqui

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Posted : 09 October, 2005 4:00 am
hearty nati OWC
(@hearty-nati-owc)
Eminent Member

Tena ano tatou katoa

He mea papai rawa atu kua whakaturia tenei tuahuatanga ma tatou, kia korerohia nga take penei e rite ana ki te paepae o te marae atea.

Ki oku nei whakaaro, me whai tena iwi, tena iwi i tona ake ara hei whakapakari i te reo tuturu i ahu mai ai i tera rohe.

Kei roto i te rohe o Ngai Tuhoe, kaore i tamia te reo i reira, i korero tonu ratou i te reo tuturu, te reo Tuhoe. Ki te rongo koe ki nga kaikorero no Tuhoe, kei roto katoa a ratou whakawhitiwhitihanga i te reo tuturu ma ratou.

No reira, taku ano nei ma koutou, e mau ki te reo tuku iho a o kotou tipuna kia kore ai e warewaretia.

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Posted : 13 October, 2005 12:02 am
waahinemaori OWC
(@waahinemaori-owc)
New Member

quote:


I have been trying to learn te reo (from Australia) and found some stuff on dialectial differences, and one was in te Wai Pounamu they use K instead of NG. Is this for some things or all? or is it not used contemparily ? Or is it just wrong?

thanks Chris



Kia ora Chris, I know there are different dialects for different areas but in this day and age it doesn't really matter unless you yourself want to be grammatically correct as I am pretty sure the Modern Maori taught in schools has been modified so it can be used throughout NZ.

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Posted : 19 October, 2005 7:19 pm
hearty nati OWC
(@hearty-nati-owc)
Eminent Member

i think that each iwi should retain their own mita because it is something special and traditional for them and them alone.

i was brought up by my grandparents.my koka was from ngati porou and spoke that mita.my koroua was from tuhoe and he spoke in that mita.

when i speak maori, i speak in a tuhoe accent but use words which are unique to both tuhoe and ngati porou.these days people tell me to stick to one rather than speak both but it is my choice to represent my tipuna the best way i know how, to continue the usage of both of my tipuna and ensure it never dies.

i think that if urban maori wish to learn maori, learn generic maori at kura or wananga then return home and learn the particular mita of your hapu,iwi or waka.kia kaha te korero maori, kei ngaro i te ao ki te po e

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Posted : 22 October, 2005 3:16 pm
hearty nati OWC
(@hearty-nati-owc)
Eminent Member

people from kaitahu have to keep speakin their reo.too many kaitahu i have met cant even speak maori,let alone speak in kaitahu.

its important because it forms a part of their identity,their mana motuhake as indigenous maori and as being tuturu kaitahu...hey maybe a new slogan lol

TUTURU KAITAHU!!

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Posted : 22 November, 2005 11:14 pm
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