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Maori spirituality  

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rosa OWC
(@rosa-owc)
Active Member

Hi, I am a writer and am attempting to write a book based in New Zealand (i have been here for almost a year now)and would like there to be an essence of Maori spirituality in it, that is to say, i would like to reflect ancient beliefs that are still held by Maoris today, primarily concerning issues of death, souls, life cycle etc...i would also like to make a connection to dreams, but really need to find out what relevance, if any, dreams have within Maori belief systems...i am fully aware that not every Maori will necessarily believe in the same things, but am trying to find unifying beliefs which have transcended through time i.e. have withstood the appropriation by another culture and still hold fast today. If anyone can give me a starting point on Maori beliefs on spirituality i would be most grateful...of course if the book was ever to be published i would need accurate historical/academic supervision to ensure correct interpretation of something which i am largely ignorant of myself...but for now i just need a kick start...

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Posted : 15 January, 2007 8:00 am
pono OWC
(@pono-owc)
Eminent Member

kia ora rosa

I wanted to be a book writer too!lol!
"my life & my kuia died aged 104 yrs
old lived at paeroa"

where are you from and how long you'll be staying in aotearoa?

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Posted : 15 January, 2007 11:22 am
teawaiti OWC
(@teawaiti-owc)
Active Member

You could read Rose (Dr Rangimarie Turiki) Pere's book "Te Wheke" who's concepts are not unique to her own people's - I believe she is getting on abit now and may not be availiable in person.

However other female aurthors are Hinewirangi Morgan-Kohu or Jayne Matenga-Kohu - who you may be able to track down.

However the starting point of maori spirituality is normally the maori version of Genesis "The separation of Papatuanuku (mother earth) and Ranginui(sky father)" and their children.

About the dreams - that interests me too. Although Ive been brought up to believe from my mother that dreams about death, mean the exact opposite for example I dreamed that my brother had died and my mother told me not to worry, it means hes going to be alright. I think it was her way of saying their was a strong bond between us on a higher spiritual level/kinship even though we grew up fighting one another. Or maybe it was just a mother protecting her child. And so it may be posssible to have relationships with people subconsciously and in our dreams. And maybe this is why the stories of these children who separated papa & rangi are of so much importance ... to us as maori.

teawaiti
39yo Mauri Ora student - "youre never to young or old to learn" ph 08006244672 for free programme.

Edited by - teawaiti on Jan 22 2007 4:57:54 PM

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Posted : 15 January, 2007 12:35 pm
pono OWC
(@pono-owc)
Eminent Member

kia ora
my grandmother always used to ask me "had a dream"?

I understand why she did it! She always wins on horse races. Now, I have follow her footsteps lol!

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Posted : 15 January, 2007 5:16 pm
pono OWC
(@pono-owc)
Eminent Member

Can anyone here interprete dreams?

my partner had a dream last night, a kuia says in voices to my partner "get rid of your skeleton"?

This one I cannot pick!

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Posted : 15 January, 2007 5:22 pm
kuri OWC
(@kuri-owc)
Active Member

Rosa;

I believe that dreams are important to our people some can be prophetic. As children we were encouraged to talk about our dreams first thing after waking up...sometimes when things were getting pretty tough on my mother who was a widow, she would say that she wold be catching the bus to Auckland(a euphemism for sleep) and she would ask Uncle Charlie what to do...she would sleep for 20 minutes or so and scratch her head and say yes the kehua had been and this is what we will do...it worked well at defusing a lot of crisis.

To dream of death means new beginnings. Dream of the dead, hear of the living.

Pono;

I am no professional but his is how I see yor partners dream.

I feel your partner is hanging onto "old bones" from his past, the kuia is telling him to let go, so he can move forward...he has mistaken these old bones for what gives him his form.

The bones maybe wrongs done to him, or by himself, he needs to find the power to forgive those who wronged him, and seek forgiveness from those he has wronged, he knows which one applies to himself.

kuri

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Posted : 15 January, 2007 8:15 pm
matahuru OWC
(@matahuru-owc)
Eminent Member

Kia ora Kuri

I agree. It is significant that that dream used english words which would suggest a connection to the english saying, "Skeletons in the closet". There is something your partner has done or involved with in his past, that he has not come to terms with. Try talking about it with him, ask him what is the worst thing he has ever done. If he looks uncomfortable or has trouble wording it, then it it is pretty serious (to him) and you must give him time. We all have things in our past that we would rather not have done. Some more serious than others. He knows what it is. If not then there is something upsetting his emotional stability that needs addressing.

Now as for Maori spirituality, you could try my posting "Taha Wairua" in the whakapapa forum for a glimpse at some of the spiritual views that have already been shared by members. It is very interesting and to my knowledge one of the largest threads (in terms of replies) on this site. A very interesting read.

Kia ora and good luck with everthing.

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Posted : 16 January, 2007 7:40 am
pono OWC
(@pono-owc)
Eminent Member

kia ora

thank-you both kuri and matahuru.
Do you guys know these names? Could be tupuna or hapu, pukenga and ngati tu?
arohamai, tried to figure out same dream more from what the kuia says........
" taupo was the good ole days ngati tu. Then, she say they know about pukenga"!

The kuia he dream names
te miri kahu mohi-moses.

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Posted : 16 January, 2007 12:59 pm
matahuru OWC
(@matahuru-owc)
Eminent Member

Kia ora pono

Ngati Tu are from Te Whanganui-a-Orotu or, there is at least one version of the name there. Because Taupo is mentioned, that would suggest Ngati Tu-Whare-Toa or Ngati Tu for short although I dont think whanau from Taupo would appreciate the truncation of their Iwi name. It could be confused with their cousins from Whanganui.

Pukenga has many meaning that I am aware of. The most commonly used context for this word is, Learned, Tohunga, Skilled etc. I was once told by a tohunga that the ancient schools of learning in his area were divided into 3 sections. Te Whare Hiringa, Te Whare Pukenga, Te Whare Wananga. He demonstrated it by drawing 3 cirlces one within another. The first being the inner (Te Whare Hiringa) the last the outer (Te Whare Wananga).

He then went on to say that the inner circle were monks of sorts. Once they entered the sacred house, they would not leave until death. They would chant and trance out communing with dimensions unknown to the average person.

The Tohunga were the only ones, besides slaves (to feed and remove waste), that were allowed in there into Te Whare Hiringa. A monk would break from the chanting and explain to the tohunga certain matters of interest communicated from the gods or ancestors.

These Tohunga were from Te Whare Pukenga. They would edit the information from the monks and pass it to the next house which were the warrior priests from Te Whare Wananga. This last house would then pass the information onto the common people.

Members of Te Whare Pukenga had a very important job. They would be the buffer for info coming from the gods/tupuna to the average man.

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Posted : 16 January, 2007 4:23 pm
matahuru OWC
(@matahuru-owc)
Eminent Member

Oh and there is also a hapu of that name from Manaia, Coromandel area. Ngati Pukenga.

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Posted : 16 January, 2007 4:25 pm
pono OWC
(@pono-owc)
Eminent Member

Thank-you thank-you matahuru.

This dream, I had pick three horses for trifecta on saturday.
1st (10)generated
2nd (2)4 good reasons
3rd (8)texas

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Posted : 16 January, 2007 7:27 pm
matahuru OWC
(@matahuru-owc)
Eminent Member

You are very welcome. Good luck with your bet and I may even have a flutter myself! hehe

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Posted : 18 January, 2007 8:36 am
pono OWC
(@pono-owc)
Eminent Member

quote:


You are very welcome. Good luck with your bet and I may even have a flutter myself! hehe


Kia ora matahuru
Ah interest in flutter!
hehehe! already runs last saturday gone and has won!

sorry off topic here hehehe!
matahauru I know you........nicks BJ, or JJ sounds fimiliar?

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Posted : 18 January, 2007 9:28 am
matahuru OWC
(@matahuru-owc)
Eminent Member

Kia ora pono

hehe yes they are my whanaunga. haha I was enjoying my anonymity here. All good tho I knew it wouldnt last long. hahaha How do you know them?

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Posted : 18 January, 2007 11:35 am
Hine Te Po OWC
(@hine-te-po-owc)
Active Member

Where are you from, and what is the nature of the book. Surely writing a book incorporating Maori spirituality is simply another form of misappropriation.

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Posted : 20 January, 2007 3:23 pm
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