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KOIA, KATAE, NGERENGERE, WI REPA, TANGIRA WHANAU  

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mhoeta OWC
(@mhoeta-owc)
Active Member

The Wirepa Whanau are my cousins on my mums side, they were quite a large family who lived in Arapae together with Uncle Charlie Campbell, (they lived in separate areas)I visited there once or twice as a child, about the mid 1950s. Cousin Kingi passed away recently in Tekuiti, but I was unable to attend. Arohanui ki Te Whanau Pani. I can give you Wirepa names and a contact if you want.

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Posted : 09/03/2008 9:07 am
mhoeta OWC
(@mhoeta-owc)
Active Member

If anyone has information about Rangikohere Parekowhai Martin, I'm keen to hear your korero. She was Maniapoto, Tainui, (perhaps, not certain of any facts really)she was definitely attached to the Otewa Marae in Otorohanga, my mother Mabel Ngawai Lowry was raised there for at least part of her life. My grandfather John Lowry was part scottish, a descendant of Archibal Lowry.

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Posted : 09/03/2008 9:18 am
Andrea Swinton
(@swintonclan)
New Member

Kia ora,

Hariata Tangira (nee Wi Repa or Wirepa) & Tangira Pohoi (aka Pakaura) are my maternal great-grandparents. My grandmother Mona, Te Ataiti Parkinson (nee Tangira) who married Walter John Parkinson of Opotiki. Mona along with their 11 children ran a dairy farm at Te Paripari/Motuaruhe while Walter worked at building the main road around the coast to help supplement their whanau income. Mona and Walters descendants to this day continue to reside on our ancestral Wirepa land at Te Paripari/Motuaruhe, which is situated on the Te Kaha side of Whanarua Bay.

Te Paripari/Motuaruhe/Whanarua Bay/Maraehako Bay area was once the ancestral home of the Wi Repa whanau and hapu Te Rangi-e-Runga, and direct descendants of Te Umanga, although he lacked the fighting skills of  his older brothers Tamahae and Kahurautao, Te Umanga was a tactical and clever man i.e. cleverly married his children into other tribes to consolidate and gain support when needed.

Don't remember the dates exactly but while our men/warriors were away down the east coast helping Ngati Porou fight a war, the woman, children and old people of Te Rangi-e-Runga were brutally slaughtered and butchered by Te Ehutu in retaliation for not supplying them with food while under siege for a year by Nga Puhi for the killing of 6 of their fisherman who had been blown way off course during a storm. Te Ehutu claimed that the 6 Nga Puhi fishermen were a marauding war party to justify their heinous actions. After murdering most of the Te Rangi-e-Runga woman, children and elderly, the remaining survivors were buried up to their necks in the sand/beach just above the low water mark at Maraehako Bay so they would drown when the tide came in and being ripped to shreds by sharks attracted by all the blood, pretty gruesome way to die, especially as our innocent people had to pay the price for Te Ehutu's double acts of cowardice and the fact they had lost the battle to Nga Puhi.  

Te Ehutu took the Marahaeko River bed and surrounding area in cowardly conquest and then on-sold it to one of their Te Ehutu hapu members, Maori Land Court Judge, Hamiora Hei, who had been gifted a house site at Maraehako by one of our Wi Repa whanau for services rendered. Our surviving warriors who returned from helping Ngati Porou were never able to seek revenge for the injustice that was done to our Te Rangi-e-Runga whanau due to being colonised by the pakeha, grief at losing their whanau, not enough warriors and the advent of european laws and to this day we are still having "salt constantly being rubbed into and open festering wound" by Te Ehutu.  

Kahurautao, his wife Kiritapu and whanau were relocated from their pa at Waikawa Point to the current site at Pahaoa around 1858 to provide shelter/accomodation for our people on the eastern side of the Kereu River i.e. at night time and darkness prevented a safe crossing or in times of floods etc. Kaiaio Marae is situated on the western/Te Kaha side and likewise serviced that side. 

Our Tangira whanau resided at Kaikoura which is situated on the eastern side of the mouth of the Raukokore River, Wairuru Marae and belong to the iwi of Te Whanau-a-Maruhaeremuri. My grandmother was one of the younger siblings and lived at Kaikoura with her grandparents until their deaths then she was sent to live with her parents and siblings at Te Paripari/Motuaruhe where she lived for most of her life. 

There is still descendants of Ewa living here on their Motuaruhe ancestral lands and we are all blood related. Come meet your Tangira/Wi Repa whanau and visit Wairuru/Pahaoa Marae although, you can whakapapa to most of the marae in our Te Whanau-a-Apanui rohe. 

There are some interesting sites online which will be able to help with your research, just type in Wi Repa or Tangira Whakapapa and you will be able to get all of the correct names etc. of our grandparents and great-grandparents. I can never remember all the names and sequence of their siblings but there are whanau you can help you.

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Posted : 15/03/2018 3:26 am
nkata001
(@nkata001)
New Member

There were two men named "Buster" or "Bus" Katae - my Grandfather Harawira Katae and his son (my uncle)
who I only knew as Bus. It was my Grandfather who was married to Whakaara Rangihuna and my uncle who was the Street Identity in Gisborne.

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Posted : 29/04/2019 5:37 pm
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