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TE WHAREUMU,Kohu  

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Mk2_Zephyr OWC
(@mk2_zephyr-owc)
Active Member

Hi, looking for ANY information about Katherine (Kohu) Te Whareumu, esp, her date of death. Katherine married Joseph Bryers and they lived in Kawakawa and the Hokianga, they married about 1838, Joseph died in 1885.

My girlfriend is a direct descendant of James Kiwikiwi Norris Bryers, son of the above.

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Posted : 02 February, 2007 9:11 pm
Monica Foggin OWC
(@monica-foggin-owc)
New Member

Hi, I am researching this family for my son-in-law, who is descended from Joseph Bryers through Leonie Adelaide Bryers. Leonie married Nikorima McDowell Stephens.
I'd love to find out more information on them, if possible
Regards,
Monica

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Posted : 26 September, 2007 2:56 am
enoka07 OWC
(@enoka07-owc)
Active Member

THE LIFE AND ADVENTURES OP JOHN MARMON, THE HOKIANGA PAKEHA MAORI;
Otago Witness, Issue 1583, 25 March 1882, Page 25
At Kawakawa there lived a European who had for his wife a native woman of rank, daughter of the late chief named (Whareumu) King George, and sister of the present chief of the same name.
This white man had been to the Bay of Islands. Two men were with him, pulling in the boat. On their way they fell in with a whaleboat; it was drifting. There was a coat or cloak and oars in the boat, which one of the men took possession of— a Yankee, I think he was, the other an Englishman, However, to make a long story short, after they got home they began to quarrel about what they had found; and the Yankee, in a rage, went off to the Bay of Islands, and informed the magistrate, Captain Beckham, of what he termed a robbery. A warrant was made out and constables went to the Kawakawa to arrest the chief. The cloak was not found, and there was a row. The police drew their cutlasses, and in the scrimmage the wife of the European got her hand scratched, but not badly. The woman had seized the cutlass, and it was in taking it away from her that the wound was inflicted. The constables took the two men to the Bay of Islands. Shortly after this there was a great outcry; the natives were flying about in all directions with the news that King George's sister Kohu was wounded, then that she was dead. King George and his tribe started off to see the supposed dead woman and found that her hand had been cut with a cutlass; her blood had been split, and must be paid for. Kawiti and his men joined, and together they proceeded to the magistrate at the Bay of Islands, and demanded of Captain Beckham ten pounds payment for the wounding of Kohu. 'No, you taurekareka (Slave), I will not give you anything’. The wound, such as it is was an accident; the constables were doing their duty, and the woman had no business to interfere. “I want twenty pounds, now”, said King George, “for calling, me a slave”. “I don't care what you want,'' said Captain Beckham “I will not give you one far thing”.
When the chiefs found they could do nothing with the magistrate they cleared put. The magistrate did not understand the flour and sugar humbug. I suppose a little later on a magistrate would never have spoken so to a New Zealander. Pakeha soldier officers like Captain Beckham thought law was law, aboard snip or ashore, and did not tolerate bounce from savages. L am sure the natives would have been much better if they had been treated properly from the first, instead of like a lot of babies— one time coddled and another bullied. There were plenty of fine sensible chiefs who could understand well enough, and were not the fools they were thought to be by the pakeha, who found out, though rather late in the day, that they were not the only people, in the world who knew how to fight. The next morning the chiefs went to the Police Court again and asked for payment, and on this occasion they were accompanied by the Rev. Mr Williams, Churoh of England missionary, who advised Captain Beckham to give the natives something to keep them quiet. He, however, refused to give the natives anything, and the whole mob went away. The two men were tried for stealing the coat, which belonged to; Captain Hingston. The Englishman got two years imprisonment— the Yankee went scot free for having informed. I have forgotten the exact date, but I think it was after Heke cut down the flagstaff the first time, that Governor 'Fitzroy and a party of officials went to the Waimate, and, after a great deal of talking on both sides, peace was promised, but we folks here took very little interest in the affair.
http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/cgi-bin/paperspast?a=d&srpos=1&cl=search&d=OW18820325.2.59&e=-------en--1----0kohu+of+kororareka-all

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Posted : 09 January, 2008 11:43 am
Mk2_Zephyr OWC
(@mk2_zephyr-owc)
Active Member

and it lead to the sacking of Russell.

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Posted : 10 January, 2008 1:42 am
jabwtworkpty OWC
(@jabwtworkpty-owc)
Active Member

quote:


Hi, looking for ANY information about Katherine (Kohu) Te Whareumu, esp, her date of death. Katherine married Joseph Bryers and they lived in Kawakawa and the Hokianga, they married about 1838, Joseph died in 1885.

My girlfriend is a direct descendant of James Kiwikiwi Norris Bryers, son of the above.


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Posted : 02 March, 2008 1:30 am
jabwtworkpty OWC
(@jabwtworkpty-owc)
Active Member

Ooops sorry! I am a direct descendant of Joseph Bryers and Ka Kohu Te Whareumu thru their son, John Bryers=Maraea Perry. A lot of information has been posted on the Church of Jesus Christ of Latterday Saints website called Family Search. Some of it was put there before family reunions to correct it but there is a lot there for you to begin with now. Kia ora Jenny.

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Posted : 02 March, 2008 1:37 am
jabwtworkpty OWC
(@jabwtworkpty-owc)
Active Member

Kia Ora Mk2 Zephyr
The Bryers Whanau had a big reunion in Rawene (on land that Kohu helped donate to the township of Rawene) in 1990 where a lot of genealogy was corrected and which most of those families that attended were given copies as a part of their fees. The Family Search information should have been updated but not necessarily.

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Posted : 02 March, 2008 1:44 am
Mk2_Zephyr OWC
(@mk2_zephyr-owc)
Active Member

Kia Ora Ja,
That would have been an excellent gathering, pity we didn't have all the info back then. Any copies of the tree, would be most welcome. I have read Judith Holloways book about the Bryers family, great reading.

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Posted : 05 March, 2008 8:31 am
Deborah Cooke
(@deborah-cooke)
New Member

Hi, I am establishing my ancestry. I would like any information on my grandmother Joan Stephanie Bryers, born in 1915, her father is Frederick Tautari Bryers, born 1885

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Posted : 10 July, 2019 9:10 pm
Deborah Cooke
(@deborah-cooke)
New Member

Hi my name is Deborah Cooke, I am exploring my mothers ancestry. My mothers adopted name is Judith Marie Burrows. She was born Shona Ruby Hodge in Raetihi in 1941 and adopted out around age 2. Her mothers name is Joan Stephanie Bryers. I am very interested to know any information on Judith Marie Burrows and understand she had children at a young age. Regards, Deborah.

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Posted : 10 July, 2019 9:14 pm
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